I’m pleased to be contributing another episode to the Radio GDR podcast, again with Dr. Edward Larkey. This time Ed and I look at the relationship between popular music and politics in the GDR. You can find the episode here: https://radiogdr.com/politics-and-pop-music-of-east-germany-part-2/.

This episode is the first of two with this theme and looks at the 50s and 60s; we’ll cover the 70s and 80s the next time around.

The eastern German city of Leipzig is known as the “City of Heroes” for its role as home to the protests which led to the demise of the state socialist regime. Explanations for why Leipzigers took to the streets have often focused on a number of factors including political repression, the desire to travel and economic stagnation, but author/academic Andrew Demshuk makes a compelling argument in his book Bowling for Communism that, for many Leipzigers, the slow motion decay was a decisive factor in their decision to rise up.

Demshuk will make his case at an online event presented by the Goethe-Institut Toronto on Thursday, January 28th from 6 – 7 pm EST. I’ll be joining the author to discuss his exciting work and it would be great to have some GDR Objectified readers there too.

For further details on this event and to register, click here.

Looking for ways to spend time with my family this Christmas season, I decided to try my hand at the medium of felt buildings. My partner and daughter were working on seasonally-themed structures, but I figured GDR modern structures might benefit from the felt treatment . . .

First up, was a recreation of the “Maple Leaf” canteen in central East Berlin. The building’s distinctive roof was the trademark design of the iconic GDR architect Ulrich Müther and its shape gave the building its name. The canteen opened in 1973 and could seat up to 880 diners at once with its clientele coming from local schools and workplaces. Sadly, the “Maple Leaf” fell to the wrecking ball in 2000.

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Had Täve Schur not existed, the GDR would have had to have invented him. In fact, one might argue that it did.

Gustav-Adolf Schur, or Täve as he is known to all East Germans of a certain age, was a road racing cyclist whose fame grew throughout the course of the 1950s as he moved from one sporting success to the next.

Täve Schur celebrates winning the Karl-Marx-Stadt to Leipzig leg of the 1955 Peace Race
(photo: Bundesarchiv Bild 183-30443-0001)

His evolution into becoming an East German sporting icon was not, however, simply the result of his remarkable career, but also a reflection of his having been embraced by the nascent Workers and Peasants’ State. Indeed, Schur emerged onto the scene at a time when the GDR leadership was searching for ways to raise the country reputation both at home and abroad. In Schur, the regime found a homegrown hero who was demonstrating to the world – and his fellow East Germans – the heights which they – and, implicitly, their political / social system – could reach.

For those interested in the aural medium of podcasting, I have once again had the pleasure of contributing to the excellent Radio GDR podcast, this time for an episode entitled “Musik in der DDR: Rock and Pop Music of East Germany”.

In this episode, I explore a variety of topics related to popular music in the GDR with Dr. Ed Larkey, a professor of German and Intercultural Communication at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Dr. Larkey was a great interviewee as not only has his academic research included a variety of aspects of GDR popular culture and media, but these interests grew out of his experiences studying and working in the country during the 1980s.

The Leuna Works, 1980 (Dietmar Rabich / Wikimedia Commons / “Leuna, Leuna-Werke — 1980 — 21” / CC BY-SA 4.0).

While East German planners placed great hopes in Leuna and Buna as drivers for the GDR’s economy, developing these sites came at a considerable cost to the environment. Both facilities caused significant damage to air, soil and water in the immediate vicinity and beyond. In fact, some have argued that the catastrophic state of the East German environment was a key factor in bringing people to the protests in Leipzig, a city badly impacted by the effects of the country’s chemical industry and home to the demonstrations which ultimately helped drive the SED from power..

In this last post on Leuna and Buna, we’ll look at the environmental damage which emanated from these two sites.

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Youth Researcher Collective in the Leuna Works Research Centre, October 1971 (Photo: Bundesarchiv Bild 183-K1027-0014)

In our previous post on the Chemical Works at Leuna and Buna, the focus was very much on the political and economic history of those sites. But what was working life like for the nearly 50,000 East German workers who were employed at these works (28,000 at Leuna, 18,000 at Buna)? In this post, I’ll speak to someone who did just that in the hopes of getting a glimpse into the life of a blue collar worker in the “Workers and Peasants State”.

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Whenever I think of Leuna and Buna, two of the GDR’s largest chemical production facilities, I am reminded of a pivotal scene in Mike Nichol’s iconic 1967 film “The Graduate”. In it, Dustin Hoffman’s character Ben, a recent college graduate struggling to figure out his place in the world, is taken aside at a party by Mr. McGuire, a man of his father’s generation who wishes to impart some wisdom to the young man:

“I just want to say one word to you,” the older man begins earnestly. “Just one word. Are you listening?”
“Yes sir,” responds Ben.
When Mr. McGuire is sure that he has the younger man’s attention, he finally speaks: “Plastics.”

What, you may be asking, does this have to do with two East German industrial facilities? Well, imagine Walter Ulbricht in the role of Mr. McGuire while the the East German populace is Ben. The pitch takes place not at a cocktail party in mod, 60s-era California bungalow, but rather nine years earlier at the “GDR Chemical Conference” taking place at the Leuna Works (GDR, always at the vanguard of progress! ed.). For it is here that SED leader Ulbricht articulated the Party’s vision for the GDR’s economic future which famously included the promise that “chemistry brings bread, prosperity and beauty”. This dream of better living through chemistry represented a broadening of the GDR’s economic focus to include not just Stalinist-style heavy industry (e.g. steel and machine building) but also the quickly emerging petrochemical chemical industry, a move which represented a big gamble. Read More

 

From Ein Stein, Ein Kalk, Ein Kran, Louis Rauwolf/Klaus Lettke (Verlag Tribuene Berlin)

The GDR was not a society necessarily known for its humour and certainly not for its irony, at least not in the Party-controlled media. That said, “real existing socialism” was rife with contradictions and situations which provided ample fodder for the country’s humorists both professional and amateur. The country’s best known cartoonists were Louis Rauwolf and Klaus Lettke a pair who achieved considerable public profile and popularity for the carefully crafted barbs of everyday East German life, many of which appeared in Eulenspiegel, the GDR’s satirical magazine. It’s interesting to try and glean the limits to what was acceptable. While problems of everyday life and reflected here with relative accuracy, fault for these shortcomings are typically found with individuals themselves, certainly not the Party or decision makers. The cartoons found here are from Ein Stein, Ein Kalk, Ein Kran, a collection of cartoons which dealt with the theme of housing and appeared in 1987. Read More

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